10 Best 24″ Kids’ Bikes

What’s the Best Bike for Kids 8 to 11 years old?

Like adult bikes, 24″ bikes can vary greatly in form and function. While they generally fit kids ages 8, 9, 10, and 11-years-old, they can be specialized for everything from triathlons to road riding, cyclocross, and single track mountain bike riding. Most families, however, simply want a well-designed and good-quality, reliable bike that will last their kids for several years.

Regardless of what type of riding your child has an interest in, the weight should play a significant role in your decision process. Kid-specific bike companies like WOOM, Prevelo, Pello, and Guardian lead the market in designing lightweight bikes that are easy for kids to balance and handle. Here are our favorite 24″ bikes that we feel are best for the typical bike-riding child aged 8 to 11.

10 Best Bikes for 8 to 11-year-olds

Bike

Why We Love It

MSRP

WOOM 5

Best for Budding Bike Enthusiasts

$479

Guardian Original

Best for Neighborhood Riders

$429

Prevelo Alpha Four

Best for Aggressive Riders

$499

Guardian Ethos

Best Mid-Priced

$329

Pello Reyes

Most Versatile: Adventurous Rider

$599

Frog 62

Most Versatile: Basic Rider

$550

Cleary Scout

Best Down Country Mountain Bike

$840

Prevelo Zulu Four

Best Cross Country Mountain Bike

$899

Raleigh Rowdy 24"

Best on a Budget

$290

Priority Start 24

Best for Simplified Shifting & Maintenance

$399

WOOM 5

Best for Budding Bike Enthusiasts


WOOM 5 24" kid's bike in green

MSRP: $479

SEAT HEIGHT: 26.4″ – 32.3″

WEIGHT: 18.1 lbs.

READ MORE: WOOM 5 Review

The WOOM 5’s combination of a more upright position, a wider gearing range, and slightly wider tires makes it ideal for beginning to intermediate riders on various surfaces. Because it’s so versatile in use, it’s especially great for young riders who have a love for bike riding, but haven’t seriously committed to road or aggressive trail riding. The WOOM 5 is a solid, does-it-all bike for your budding bike enthusiast.

PROS
  • Lightweight with a low minimum seat height
  • Wide range of gears (8-speed) for tackling various terrains and elevations
  • Low center-of-gravity geometry for better balance and maneuverability
  • Easy-to-use grip shifters and other high-end components
  • Gorgeous, and with a nice variety of colors available

CONS
  • For some riders, the saddle can take some getting used to

 


Guardian Original

Best for Neighborhood Riders


Guardian 24" kid's bike in red and black

MSRP: $429

SEAT HEIGHT: 25″ – 33″

WEIGHT: 23 lbs.

READ MORE: Guardian 24″ Review

You wouldn’t think that brakes on a kid’s bike would be a big deal, but Guardian Bikes prove otherwise. Their proprietary SureStop braking system helps kids of all riding abilities feel more confident and less anxious, whether they’re riding to their friend’s house or across town. With just one brake lever that sequentially engages the rear brake followed by the front brake, timid kids feel more secure, and aggressive kids have the added stopping power they need.

Guardian recently came out with a budget-friendly “Ethos” line of bikes that we also really love. You can read our full review of the Ethos 24″ here, or check out the Ethos on Guardian’s website.

PROS
  • Patented SureStop braking system for faster and more controlled braking
  • Shimano Revoshift grip shifters provide smooth shifting (7-speed)
  • Low center-of-gravity design for better balance and maneuverability
  • Great quality build for the price
  • Fun, kid-approved designs

CONS
  • Slightly heavier, and components aren’t as high-end as some of the other bikes on this list


Prevelo Alpha Four

Best for Aggressive Riders & Basic Trail Riders


Prevelo Alpha Four 24" kid's bike in silver

MSRP: $499

SEAT HEIGHT: 25.8″ – 31.2″

WEIGHT: 21.2 lbs.

READ MORE: Prevelo Alpha Four Review

With a Shimano ALTUS 8-speed drivetrain, trigger shifters, an aggressive body position, and wider tires, the Prevelo Alpha Four is the best of the lot for really aggressive riders and those just getting started on single-track. With 24 x 1.5″ Kenda Small Block Eight tires, the Alpha offers great traction for basic trail riding as well for adventerous riders who eagerly scout out every dirt jump in the neighborhood. For true mountain biking, Prevelo’s Zulu Four has an air fork, hydraulic disc brakes, and 10 speeds.

PROS
  • Lightweight, low step-through frame
  • Low center-of-gravity for better balance
  • Narrow Q-factor for maximum leverage on pedals
  • 24 x 1.5 Kenda Small Black Eight knobby tires
  • Top quality components

CONS
  • Limited color options
  • Trigger shifters challenging for some kids


Guardian Ethos

Best Mid-Priced


Guardian Ethos 24" kid's bike in light blue for girls

MSRP: $329

SEAT HEIGHT: 25″ – 33″

WEIGHT: 25.5 lbs.

READ MORE: Guardian Ethos 24″ Review

A more budget-friendly version of the Guardian Original, the Ethos line still features Guardian’s unique SureStop braking system and kid-specific fit, but keeps costs down with a steel frame, simpler graphics, and a basic grip shifter.

PROS
  • Patented SureStop braking system for faster and more controlled braking
  • Low center-of-gravity design for better balance and maneuverability
  • Great quality build for the price
  • Fun, kid-approved designs

CONS
  • Basic grip shifter (as compared to the Original’s upgraded shifter), can be hard to use
  • Steel frame has the potential to rust if paint were to chip


Pello Reyes

Most Versatile: Adventurous Rider


Pello Reyes 24" kid's bike in orange

MSRP: $599

WEIGHT: 21.9 lbs.

FULL REVIEW: Pello Reyes Review

From paved bike trails to smooth rolling single-track, the Reyes is the ultimate multi-trick pony for the adventurous 8 to 10-year old.  Built with a lightweight and nimble frame, Tektro mechanical-disc brakes, a responsive Cane Creek headset and topped with 9-speeds controlled by a SRAM X9 grip shift, the Reyes is built ready.  Taking it one step further, the Reyes comes equipped with 24 x 1.95″ Kenda Krad tires that are not only the widest tires in this group, they provide a ton of bite for adventurers on packed dirt trails, yet are low profile enough to provide a smooth ride on pavement.

Have a true grom on your hands?  Convert the Reyes into the ultimate mountain bike by going tubeless (rims are tubeless compatible) and for $140 add on a Spinner Grind Air fork at purchase (geometry is suspension corrected).  At $740 total, it’s a super affordable and legit mountain bike option.

PROS
  • High-end components including Cane Creek headset, Kenda Krad tires, and Tektro disc brakes with kid-sized hand levers
  • 9 speed Sram X9 shifter with super low gear to tackle gnarly hills
  • Single-track worthy but with grip shifters for those who prefer grip over trigger
  • Versatile in use – lightweight also makes it suitable for long distance rides
  • With optional upgrades including suspension fork and dropper post, you can easily convert the Reyes to a full-blown mountain bike

CONS
  • Higher price tag


Frog 62

Most Versatile: Basic Rider


islabikes frog 62 pedal bike 24" - purple

MSRP: $550

WEIGHT: 20.3 lbs.

READ MORE: Frog 62 Review

Hailing from bike enthusiast parents in the UK, Frog Bikes are another kid-focused bike brand that designs their bikes top-to-bottom for kids. Built on a lightweight, yet strong aluminum frame paired with top-of-the-line components, the Frog 62 provides a unique blend of performance, price, and precise fit.

Coming standard with both street and extra knobby all-terrain tires, the Frog 62 can handle everything from long distance paved riding to beginning mountain bike trails. And as one of the most lightweight trail-worthy bikes on this list, it makes those climbs just a bit easier. Frog Bikes offer more color options that any other bike manufacturer we know of, which makes finding the perfect bike for your young rider that much easier.

PROS
  • Comes with two sets of tires for any riding situation – hybrid and knobby, all-terrain
  • Versatile for everyday riding, mild all-terrain, and longer distances
  • Highly adjustable headset, stem length, and saddle height for a precision fit
  • Lightweight aluminum frame
  • Tektro short-reach levers are responsive and easy to activate
  • Tons of color options

CONS
  • Trigger shifters can be difficult for some kids to master


Cleary Scout

Best Down Country Mountain Bike


cleary scout 24" kids' bike - grey pink

MSRP: $840

WEIGHT: 27 lbs.

READ MORE: Cleary Scout Review

The Cleary Scout falls into the middle of the spectrum of mountain bike riding and is designed for smoother, flatter flow trails. It’s not an XC bike, and it’s not a gravity focused bike either. But it’s a high-quality, “bit of everything” bike to get your grom outside and have a good time.

While it may not be the lightest bike in this category, the Cleary Scout may just be the smoothest. It’s an excellent down-country bike that excels not just on the flowy trails, but at the bike park as well. If you’re looking for a bike that’s built to last and will help your kid progress while having a blast on the trails, the Cleary Scout is a solid choice.

PROS
  • Modern geometry with well thought out specs and high end components
  • Superior traction on flowy trails
  • Durable steel frame smooths out vibrations and helps kids fight fatigue longer
  • Confidence inspiring
  • Versatile – great on the trails and at the bike park

CONS
  • Steel frame can be a bit heavy for long uphill climbs


Prevelo Zulu Four

Best Cross Country Mountain Bike


prevelo zulu four 24" kids' bike - grey

MSRP: $899

WEIGHT: 25.7 lbs.

READ MORE: Prevelo Zulu Four Review

Prevelo’s really packed a lot of value into this 24” wheeled rig.  A $900 kid’s bike isn’t really pocket change for most of us, but it’s also not highway robbery either. Especially when most adults are paying double to 8 times that much on their personal bikes!

The Zulu Four’s off-road-worthy set of tires (Kenda Small Block 8 24 x 2.1) are perhaps a bit heavier and slower rolling than some others, but they make up for that with gobs of traction. And with a wide range of gears in the smooth-shifting one by ten drivetrain, the Zulu sure makes for easier climbing for your growing grom. Combine this with a lightweight frame, air fork adjustable suspension, and modern geometry and you’ve got an aggressive yet balanced approach to riding.

PROS
  • Low center of gravity gives kids confidence because they feel like they’re “in” the bike, rather than on top of it
  • Wide handlebars for great stability and steering control
  • Head angle slack enough to feel confident going down but steep enough for the front end of the bike to stay down and glued to the trail while climbing
  • Air fork adjustable suspension
  • Hydraulic brakes with tons of stopping power and good modulation
  • Smooth and crisp Shimano SLX rapid fire shifter

CONS
  • None – we love it!


Raleigh Rowdy 24″

Best on a Budget


Raleigh Rowdy 24" kid's bike in royal blue

MSRP: $290

WEIGHT: 22.14 lbs.

READ MORE: Raleigh Rowdy 20″ Review (24″ review in progress)

As your child gets older, there are fewer bikes to choose from, and they get considerably more expensive. So what do you do if the high-end bikes are beyond your budget? Fortunately, you’re not completely out of luck! Raleigh offers well-designed, solid-quality kids’ bikes at a very decent price. With lower handlebars, the Rowdy is a more leaned-forward bike best suited for confident, adventurous, and aggressive riders.

PROS
  • Quality bike for a very decent price
  • Sturdy frame and tires great for exploring off the paved trails
  • Lightweight compared to other budget 24″ bikes

CONS
  • Low/flat handlebars limit the “best use” to aggressive riders and limit the comfortable seat height range


Priority Start 24

Best for Simplified Shifting and Easy Maintenance


Priority Start 24" kids' bike in sky blue

MSRP: $399

WEIGHT: 23.3 lbs.

READ MORE: Priority Start 24 Review

Intelligently designed with just three simple gears and a grease-free belt drive, the Priority Start 24 makes kids’ biking adventures simpler and easier (and more maintenance-free for parents!). The Start boasts beautiful lines and an impressive paint job along with multi-terrain tires that accommodate everyone from timid to aggressive riders. The Priority Start is truly the full package for your neighborhood rider.

PROS
  • 3-speed internally geared hub keeps shifting simple and is very low maintenance
  • Grease-free, rust-free, essentially maintenance-free belt drive
  • Multi-terrain tires for a wide variety of uses
  • Soft and cushioned saddle
  • Dual v-pull hand brakes
  • Soft, cushioning grips
  • Gorgeous paint job – comes in 3 color options

CONS
  • 3 gears is limiting for riders who may advance to more aggressive riding

24" Bikes for Kids 8 to 11 Years Old

Bike

MSRP

WeightMin Seat HeightMax Seat HeightBrakesGearsFrame Material

woom 5

$479

18.1 lb.26.4"32.3"Dual hand, v-pull8/SRAM GripAluminum

Guardian Original

$420

23 lb.25"33"SureStop7/Shimano GripAluminum

Prevelo Alpha Four

$499

21.2 lb.25.8"31.2"Dual hand, v-pull8/Shimano TriggerAluminum

Guardian Ethos

$32025.5 lb.25"33"SureStop7/Shimano GripSteel

Pello Reyes

$599

21.9"25.25"31"Dual hand, mech disc9/SRAM GripAluminum

Frog 62

$55020.3 lb.26"32.5"Dual hand, v-pull8/Shimano TriggerAluminum

Cleary Meerkat

$594

Hydraulic Disc5/Internal HubSteel

Cleary Scout

$840

27 lb.25"33"Dual hand, hydraulic disc10/Shimano DeoreSteel

Prevelo Zulu Four

$899

25.7 lb.26"32.6"Dual hand, hydraulic disc10/Shimano TriggerAluminum

Raleigh Rowdy 24

$290

22.14 lb.Dual hand, v-pull7/Shimano GripAluminum

Priority Start 24

$399

23.3 lb.27"34.5"Dual hand, v-pull3/Nexus HubAluminum

How to Choose the Best 24″ Bike for your 8 to 11-Year-Old

Here’s a quick summary of what to look for when selecting the best bike for your 8, 9, 10, or 11-year-old. For more detailed information on the topics below, check out our article Kids’ Pedal Bikes: How to Choose.

Size

24″ kids’ bikes are generally the best fit for 8, 9, and 10-year-olds or any child between 49″ and 59″ tall. If your child is already 11 or is a very tall 10-year-old, also consider 26″ bikes as they would offer more room for growth (although very few kids’ bikes come in 26″ tires). If a child starts on a 24″ bike when they are 8, 9, or 10, they can likely continue to ride it while they are 11 or even 12 years old.

Kids on 24″ bikes are generally confident enough riders to set their seat about 2 – 3″ above the child’s inseam. At this height, a child can touch the ground with their tiptoes, which produces the best knee bend angle for pedaling with maximum efficiency.

As with all kids’ bikes, within a given wheel size category, the minimum and maximum seat heights of 24″ bikes can vary.  The average minimum seat height of a 24″ bike is around 25″ while the maximum average is about 31″.

8-year-old boy riding Pello Reyes 24" kid's bike down dirt jump, 9-year-old girl riding woom 5 24" kid's bike in the middle of the street.

The height adjustability of 24″ bike range from 5″ – 8″, which allows kids to ride 24″ bikes much longer than other sizes. For example, the average 8-year-old should have plenty of room to grow with the bike until he turns 10 or even 11.

To ensure as much longevity as possible, be sure to compare your child’s inseam to the bike’s minimum seat height before your purchase.  The Pello Reyes on the left has a minimum seat height of a little over 25″ while the woom 5 on the right has a 26.4″ minimum seat height. Make sure that you choose a bike that not only fits well now, but allows for plenty of room for growth.

 

Weight

Ideally, your child’s bike will be less than 40% of their body weight. This ratio is more important when a child is younger and just learning to ride, but is still applicable for your 8 and 9-year-olds!   In most cases, the lighter the bike, the easier the bike is to ride.  The more aggressive and longer your child rides, the more important weight becomes as well.  If trail riding or any type of riding with varied elevation is in your child’s future, aim for a bike that is less than 30% of their weight.

In regards to weight, be cautious about purchasing a 24″ bike with a shock as they can add a lot of unnecessary weight to a bike.  In most cases, the weight a shock adds to the bike quickly negates the benefits of having a shock.  Unless your child is an experienced all-terrain rider ready for the Zulu or Scout recommended above, we advise staying away from a shock on 24″ bikes.  In fact, we take this advice to heart –  until our own kids have the basic skills of mountain biking down, they ride without a shock (even in their mountain biking classes!).

Frame Design

The frames of all 24″ bikes are designed for a specific type of riding.  Whether they are designed for the average neighborhood rider (most are), for long distances (road bike), or for intense mountain biking, be sure to know HOW you plan on using the bike before you purchase one.  Don’t expect your child’s neighborhood bike to perform well on single-track mountain bike trails, or a mountain bike with front suspension to be a good fit for a 30-mile+ ride on paved surfaces.

Our “Best Of” list is mainly comprised of bikes we would classify as neighborhood bikes or light trail use, for which the vast majority of kids use a bike.  The geometry of these bikes, however, also vary greatly. Some place kids in a more upright position, which is better suited for more timid riders, while others place riders in a more aggressive, leaned forward position, which is better for more adventurous riders.

10-year-old girl on the Prevelo Alpha Four and the Guardian 24" The Prevelo's handlebars are below the hips, putting the rider in a more aggressive position.

Brakes

Dual-hand brakes are the standard braking system on most 24″ bikes.  A few will have coaster brakes, but for the most part, differences will be between what type of hand brake a bike has.  Braking systems include V-pull brakes, disc brakes (mechanical and hydraulic), and Guardian Bikes’ unique SureStop braking system.

V-Pull Brakes

Standard V-pull brakes work just fine for the mass majority of 8 to 11-year-olds, but the quality and performance of V-brakes varies from bike to bike.  High-quality, high-performing brakes are easy for kids to activate and don’t require them to exert a lot of pressure on the lever.

The brakes on higher-end bikes such as woom, Priority, Pello and Cleary are far superior to any handbrake found on a bike at a big box store.  These brands also feature short-reach levers that place the brake lever closer to their hand, only requiring kids to barely extend their fingers to activate the brake.

V-Pull vs. Disc BrakeV-pull brakes on front wheel of woom 5 24" kid's bike, disc brake on rear wheel of Pello Reyes 24" kid's bike

Disc Brakes

For those riding fast or on really aggressive downhills, consider a step-up to disc brakes.  Mechanical disc-brakes are cheaper and lower-performing than hydraulic disc brakes, but still typically offer more stopping power than v-brakes.

Hydraulic disc brakes are the cream-of-the-crop in brakes, but they are expensive, require maintenance, and are a bit of overkill for lightweight kids who have only a fraction of the inertia of adults.  For any serious mountain bike rider, however, hydraulic disc brakes are a huge benefit.

Guardian’s SureStop Brakes

Guardian’s unique patented braking system allows kids to activate both the rear and front brake with ONE brake lever.  Upon activating the single brake lever, the rear brake is activated, which is turn activates the front wheel’s brake.  As a result, it’s impossible for kids to “endo”, or be bucked off the bike by braking with only the front brake because the SureStop system prevents the front brake from being activated until after the rear brake has.

Gearing

Gears are not only fun to use, they’re essential to tackle long flat roads, hilly neighborhoods, dirt trails, and single track. By the time a child is 8 or 9-years-old, they’re probably tackling these terrains that make it beneficial to shift gears. They’re also at an age when they should be able to manage the complexity of shifting without too much trouble. And as they grow with the bike at 10 and 11-years-old, those gears will eventually become second nature.

8-year-old riding Pello Reyes 24" kid's bike on dirt bike skills park feature. 10-year-old riding Prevelo Alpha Four on paved trail.

24″ bikes are typically available with 7 or 8 gears that are shifted with one shifter.  Unlike most adult bikes that have two shifters, one for each derailleur, kids’ bikes typically have fewer gears and just one derailleur.  Having to only worry about one shifter is much easier for kids as they can simply shift up or down without having to worry about which hand and which shifter to use.

Most 24″ bikes are available with grip shifters, which kids activate by twisting the grip with the palm of their hand, or trigger shifters, which are activated by pulling or pushing on levers with their fingers.  In general, grip shifters are preferred by more timid or beginning riders as they are often easier and more intuitive to use.  Aggressive riders, especially mountain bikers, prefer trigger shifters.

Trigger vs Grip Shifter8-year-old engaging a trigger shifter in their bike, then engaging a grip shifter.

Price

Parents sometimes get a little sticker shock when they start shopping for a 24″ bike. A larger bike is just going to cost more in general, and as kids get older, components often get more advanced to keep up with a child’s more advanced riding. Every bike on this list is pretty incredible and significantly better than a bike you’ll find at Walmart. But of course, they cost more! If your child truly loves riding, try to stick to the bikes on this list. If they are beyond your budget, try to find one used! But in the end, any bike is better than no bike at all, so do whatever it takes to keep your kid riding!


Related Articles


Kids’ Bikes: How to Choose: Everything you need to know to choose the perfect bike for your child

Kids’ Bikes: Comparison Charts: To view, filter, and read reviews on over 50 kids’ bikes

8 Best Bikes for Girls: Looking for a high-performance bike in pink, purple, or cute designs? Check out our list!


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