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Kids Bike Ramps: 30+ Ideas to DIY or Buy!

Bike ramps are for everyone! Kids of all ages and skill levels love a good ramp. Kids bike ramps come in many shapes and sizes and you’re really only limited by your own creativity (and maybe your building skills, ha!).

But what type of ramp it best for your kid? Well, it depends on their skill level and how aggressive they want to be. All of the ramps below are generally good options for neighborhood riders, mountain bikers, and aspiring BMXers.

From roller ramps to kickers and teeter totters, we’ve built our own or found rad examples from our Two Wheeling Tots community that will get you inspired. And if you don’t feel like going the DIY route, we’ve found some of the best purchase options that require no work from you!


Roller Ramp

Skill Level: Beginner to advanced


10 year old girl riding over a roller ramp on a mountain bike

  • Beginner Riders: Roller ramps with gentle slopes are generally the most fun for your average bike rider. Rolling up and over mimics the fun of a roller coaster and can be as easy or aggressive as you want it to be!
  • Balance Bikes: If you intend to use a roller for a balance bike, you will need a ramp that is squatter with less aggressive slopes. Keep this in mind for both building or purchasing a ramp. 
  • Intermediate/Advanced Riders: For those kids looking to become more aggressive, rollers teach the art of pumping, approaching, and flowing up and over. 

Purchase Options

Product Name:Best For:Product Image:Price:
Sender Pro Speed BumpBeginner kid riders, may be a little narrow for a balance bike.Speed Bump Roller$152
Sender Compression RollerIntermediate to advance kid riders. Compression Roller$183
Freshpark BMX Single Pump TrackBeginner riders and up! Width is great for a balance bike, but may be a little steep with a height of 18". Single Pump Track$445
Freshpark BMX DoublePump TrackIntermediate - advance kid riders, 20" height. Double Ramp$530
OC Ramps Jordan Hoffart's Speed BumpBeginner riders and up! Balance bikers could enjoy this roller as the width is 48" and the slope is mellow. OC Ramps Roller$268

DIY Roller Ramp – Tips and Hacks

While we are no experts at ramp building, we have quickly become ramp-building fans! Sometimes it’s just a matter of diving in and learning for yourself. Here are some considerations for building a DIY roller ramp as well as some inspiration from our Two Wheeling Tots community.

Cost

Only cost $42 to build our DIY roller ramp, better yet use extra wood lying around!

Dimensions

    • Curve: When building a roller you want a curved top, versus a peaked top. A peaked top will create an abrupt transition that is not good for pumping, jumping, or flow.
    • Height: Most basic ramps start at a height of 1′ to 1.5′. With that height, your curved top may be somewhere from 2′ – 4′. If it’s for a balance biker, you will want to create a less aggressive slope. Let us know what dimensions end up working for you!
    • Transition Ratio: Backyard Trail Builds talks about appropriate ratios for roller ramps. This will be important if you plan to use a series of roller ramps.  A 1:1 ratio is great for beginners, a smooth ride and good for rolling speed. 2:1 is an expert level pump track. A ratio higher than 2:1 is generally for jumping. Learn more from him!
    • Length of Base: The length of the base will largely determine the angles of the slopes. If the slope is too steep, balance bikers and young pedal bike riders will have difficulty “climbing.”
    • Width: 24″ – 30″ wide is pretty average. Ramps narrower than 24″ take focus – keep in mind the age and skill level of your rider. We would not recommend anything narrower than 24″ for a balance biker who needs enough width to put their feet down.

Building Ideas

  • Tracing or drawing out your ramp prior to cutting is simple, if you are just drawing straight lines. We all have some type of straight edge to help us trace. But what about the curve of your roller ramp? We found this to be frustrating when tracing our DIY roller ramp. A hack for this is using a long piece of PVC pipe that bends to help you form and trace the curve of your ramp!

Bending the Wood

  • If you’re planning on using plywood for the deck of your ramp, you will have a pretty nasty curve to warp your plywood to. But don’t fret, the water trick works! Nail down your plywood to one end of the ramp, douse the plywood in water and weigh down the other side until eventually it warps to your ramp. We used 11/32 plywood and it warped in about an hour!
  • You can also cut slits on the reserve side of the plywood to help bend it to your ramp. You may loose some strength to the plywood with this method.

Transportation and Storage

  • Coaster wheels: We put small coaster wheels on the side of our kids bike ramps to make transporting and storing easier.
  • Handle: You may also consider putting a handle on the side of your ramp for easier transporting.
  • Two Halves Make a Whole: Storage is always a concern with DIY ramps. You may consider building two ramps that complete a roller ramp. But if you do that, make sure you find a way to secure your ramps together.
  • Stacking: Check out Timberfly’s Russian Roller Ramps. They stack inside of each other. We wish Timberfly Ramps shipped to the U.S., otherwise they would be included in our purchase options!

Building Plans

  • Two of our Two Wheeling Tots moms recently completed their own DIY roller ramps, following Seth’s Bike Hacks Family Ramp. While in theory this is a great family ramp, it will not work for balance bikers.
      • The ramp dimensions are 6′ long, 1′ high, the slope leading up to the curved peak is 4′ long and the down slope is 2′ long. The slope on the tail-end of the ramp is too steep for balance bikers.
      • So if you were planning on building this ramp for balance bikers we’ll save you the trouble – it won’t work. If you stretched your roller so each side was 4 feet – that would be a different story.
  • Check out Backyard Trail Builds for the perfect wood roller, intended for a backyard pump track! You can also check out his follow-up video on building his Backyard Pump Track!
  • Check out this DIY Wood Roller Build by Nj Jefferz. He builds a series of rollers to simulate a pump track, but his build is more transportable. He builds two ramps to complete a roller and designs his rollers to stack and store well next to each other.

 


Tabletop Ramp

Skill Level: Beginner to advanced


9 year old jumping a tabletop ramp on 24 inch Pello Reyes

  • Beginner Riders: Beginning or non-aggressive pedal bike riders use tabletop ramps much like rolling ramps and simply ride up and over.
  • Balance Bikes: Balance bikers love tabletops because the platform gives them a place to stand in all their glory. Again, with balance bikers they will need a tabletop with gentle slopes.
  • Intermediate/Advanced Riders: Tabletop ramps are generally the next step up from a roller ramp. Tabletops help kids practice takeoff / jumping while also providing a landing in case they come up short.  More advanced riders begin to jump and clear their tabletop jump.

Purchase Options

Product Name:Best For:Product ImagePrice
Ten Eighty Launch RampBeginner riders and up! Platform is a little short for balance bike. 1080 Ramp$45
Byclex Portable Table TopBeginner riders and up! Tabletop is about 16.4" wide, a little narrow for a balance biker. Byclex Ramp$139
Landwave Skateboard Starter Kit with 2 Ramps and 1 DeckBeginner riders and up! Can be built up to make more advanced. Landwave$174
Sender Tabletop SetsSender ramps has tabletop sets for beginner to advanced riders. Sender Tabletops$270 - $431

DIY Tabletop Ramp – Tips and Hacks

Here are some considerations for building a DIY tabletop ramp as well as some inspiration from our Two Wheeling Tots community.

Cost

The tabletop ramp can cost anywhere from $30 – $70 depending on materials and dimensions.

Dimensions

  • Height: Most basic ramps start at a height of 1′ to 1.5′. We are all about ramp progression and safety. Let your child master a smaller, less aggressive ramp first before building the crazy ramp of your dreams. Even professionals have fun on ramps that run just a foot high.
  • Width: 24″ – 30″ wide is pretty average. Anything less requires focus and will be more technical. We don’t recommend a width narrower than 24″ for a balance biker.
  • Length of Base: The length of the base will largely determine the angles of the slopes. If the slope is too steep, balance bikers and young pedal bike riders will have difficulty “climbing.” A steeper slope is great for older riders who will be using the ramp for jumping.
  • Length of Platform: For a balance biker you may want to extend the length of the platform as they like to hang out at the top. You can ensure your balance biker will fit by measuring the length or wheelbase of their bike. We recommend at least 24″ long.

Building Ideas

  • Take two kicker ramps, create a wood platform between them and secure the kickers together to form a tabletop ramp. We even took two plastic purchased ramps and connected them with a small wood platform making a DIY tabletop ramp.

Transportation and Storage

  • Coaster wheels: We put small coaster wheels on the side of our ramps to make transporting and storing easier.
  • Handle: You may also consider putting a handle on the side of your ramp for easier transporting.

Building Plans

  • Here is a DIY tabletop build specifically for balance bikes from JGentryMTB.
  • Check out this DIY tabletop build from I Like to Make Stuff. This ramp has a curved kicker that can be separated from the tabletop. You get two different style kids bike ramps with this build -a tabletop and a kicker!

 


Kicker Ramp

Skill Level: Intermediate to advanced


8 year old girl riding a mountain bike off a Byclex kicker ramp. The Yumpy is one of our favorite kids bike ramps.

  • Beginner Riders: Kicker ramps are not great for beginner riders, unless the drop height of the kicker is minimal. You can push the kicker ramp up against a curb or sidewalk to lessen the drop height for beginners. But overall, be cautious with beginner riders and kickers.
  • Balance Bikes: Not recommended for balance bikers, unless the drop height is minimal. 
  • Intermediate/Advanced Riders: Kickers are generally for those kids who have mastered jumping a tabletop ramp. Like tabletop ramps, kickers teach jumping / launching, but are less forgiving than a tabletop ramp, as there is no safety net on the other side. A kicker can also double as a landing ramp from another ramp – like a tabletop, roller, or another kicker. 

Purchase Options

Product Name:Best For:Product Image:Price:
Byclex YumpyBeginner riders and up! Beginners can use this ramp, as you can drop down the ramp for a smaller drop. Kid bike tester using the Yumpy in the picture above. Yumpy$106
Byclex KickerA more advanced kicker, but has 3 height settings to accommodate all level of riders. Byclex Kicker$161
Freshpark Portable Wedge KickerBeginner riders and up! Beginners may want to use against a curb. Freshpark Kicker$162
Sender Pro HuckGreat beginners kicker. They claim even for balance bikers! Sender Pro Huck$52
Sender StraightSender Straight comes in 3 different sizes, progressing in size. Intermediate to advanced kid riders. Sender Straight$79 - $134
Landwave Skateboard Ramp 2 PackBeginner riders and up! Beginners may want to use against a curb.Landwave 2pack Ramps$86
1080 Launch RampBeginner riders and up! Beginners may want to use against a curb. Recommended for ages 8 and up. 1080 Launch$34
New MTB Hopper IntroBest for intermediate to advanced kid riders. Height can be adjusted. Intro$182
OC Ramps Wedge BumpBeginner riders and up! Beginners may want to use against a curb. OC Ramps Kicker$199
Graw Jump Ramps G20 & G35Beginner riders and up! The G20 is great for beginners. The G35 is better for intermediate to advanced riders. Graw Jump Ramps$127 - $166

DIY Kicker Ramp – Tips and Hacks

We have yet to experiment with building kicker ramps, but they are often the easiest ramps to build! Here are some considerations for building a DIY kicker ramp as well as some inspiration from our Two Wheeling Tots Community.

Cost

Your cost could be as low as $12 if you follow the portable, fit-in-a-bag kicker ramp below. Or as high as $70 depending on parts and dimensions.

Dimensions

  • Height: 1′ – 1.5′ is plenty high for a kicker ramp. We encourage you to be conservative in your kicker ramp heights if you don’t have the ability to teach technical jumping or your child is not in lessons teaching those specific skills.
  • Width:  24″ – 30″ wide is pretty average for a ramp. Anything narrower than 24″ takes focus. With kickers you may see narrower widths like 16″. We would not recommend anything narrower than 24″ for a balance biker who needs enough width to put their feet down.

Curved Kickers

  • If your kicker has a mellow curve to it (this creates more of a kick at the end) use a piece of PVC pipe to help trace the curve, before cutting your wood out. You may also need to warp your plywood if your kicker is slightly curved. The water trick works! Nail down your plywood to one end of the ramp, douse the plywood in water and weigh it down until it eventually warps to your ramp.

Transportation and Storage

Transporting and storing a kicker ramp is pretty easy. They can be built much smaller than a roller or tabletop ramp. You can still utilize these hacks below, but they may not be necessary.

  • Coaster wheels: We put small coaster wheels on the side of our ramps to make transporting and storing easier.
  • Handle: You may also consider putting a handle on the side of your ramp for easier transporting.

Building Plans

There are many plans for kicker ramps out there, but here are a few videos that you could refer to.

  • This DIY kicker ramp is so portable it can fit in your bag and the cost to build it is roughly $12. This would be a great kicker for beginners, but even a professional has fun with it! Check out Sam Pilgrim’s portable kicker ramp build!
  • This is another portable DIY kicker ramp, but with a little more height to it. Check out this Seth Bike Hacks kicker ramp build.
  • Check out this kicker ramp build from Undialed that is 1.5′ high and 4′ long. This video also teaches you how to use the Pythagorean Theorem in building ramps.

 


Teeter Totter

Skill Level: Beginner to advanced


2 year old riding woom 1 balance bike on wooden teeter totter feature

  • Beginner Riders: Teeter totters are great for all level of riders, including beginners. Teeter totters help promote balance on the bike. To help prepare your beginner rider for a teeter totter, you can have them practice on skinnies which is basically a plank of wood on the ground.
  • Balance Bikes: Teeter totters can be one of the best features for balance bikers to enjoy, as long as the teeter totter is wide enough. They will simply go up and down over and over and over again! 
  • Intermediate/Advanced Riders: Teeter totters can accommodate advanced riders when built / or designed narrower or higher off the ground. For advanced riders you can also put a kicker ramp at the beginning or end of the teeter tooter requiring more balance and stability.  If the kicker or some type of platform is put at the end of the ramp, advanced riders can launch off their teeter totter at the end.

Purchase Options

Currently, we can only find one purchasable option for a bike teeter totter. Let us know if you know of other options out there.

Product Name:Best For:Product Image:Price:
Sender SeesawIntermediate to advanced kid riders! This teeter totter is too narrow for beginner riders and balance bikers. Sender Seesaw$272

DIY Teeter Totter Tips and Hacks

While there are not many options for purchase, there are lots of plans online for teeter totter builds. Here are some considerations for building a DIY teeter totters as well as some inspiration from our Two Wheeling Tots community.

Cost

Teeter totters can vary significantly in design and cost, but cost could be somewhere between $25 – $45.

Dimensions

  • Height: The teeter totter shown above has a 6.5″ fulcrum. Both our balance biker and our intermediate kid riders love it. It is also possible to design your teeter totter base to have adjustable heights accommodating more levels of riders or progression for your child.
  • Width:  24″ is a comfortable width, and easy to make with 4′ x 2′ plywood sheets. We would not recommend anything narrower for a balance biker or beginner rider. However, as you create more technical teeter totters you will want narrower planks than 24″.
  • Length: Using two 4′ x 2′ plywood sheets made an 8′ long teeter totter easy to build, and it’s also a great length for all of our riders – from balance bike to XS adult bike.

Building Ideas

  • Our build was super simple, and much easier than a platform ramp. Where you place your fulcrum will determine the steepness of the teeter totter. You may want to attach the fulcrum with a few screws and then test out your height before you choose its final placement.
  • A teeter totter can also be as simple as a plank of wood resting on a round piece of wood.

Building Plans

 


Skinnies

Skill Level: Beginner to advanced


11 year old riding wooden skinny feature on Marin Wildcat Trail bike

  • Beginner Riders: Skinnies – as we call them in the bike community – are great for beginner riders and have little consequence when practiced on the ground or only slightly elevated. Skinnies promote balance.
  • Balance Bikes: “Skinnies” for balance bikes should just be a painted line or very thin piece of wood. If a balance bike rider rides up on an elevated skinny, it makes it difficult for them to reach the ground except with their tip toes.
  • Intermediate/Advanced Riders: For advanced riders, create narrower skinnies and elevate them higher off the ground. More technical skinnies promote not only balance, but practice with shifting your body weight while on the bike.

DIY Skinnies – Tips and Hacks

You really don’t need wood working skills to create skinnies for your kids. It can be as simple as spare planks of wood resting on the ground. With the skinny above, we simply used scrap 2 x 4’s from our teeter totter to create a slightly elevated skinny.

 


Rock Garden Features

Skill Level: Beginner to advanced



Rock garden features help riders learn the art to obstacle riding. Obstacle riding refers to any rock, root, stick, curb or thing in your way that you need to clear on your bike.

  • Beginner Riders:  Beginners should use a simplified rock garden feature, with small obstacles. Beginner riders will start to learn the front wheel lift. The front wheel lift is instrumental for more technical obstacle riding. While some kids may never ride over many obstacles – if they don’t trail ride or mountain bike – knowing how to ride up and over something like a curb is important for any biker!
  • Balance Bikes: Balance bikers can also enjoy simple rock gardens. They will not gain much skill development, but they can still have fun learning to maneuver and sometimes lift their bike through different terrain. 
  • Intermediate/Advanced Riders: Advanced riders who have mastered the front wheel lift should practice more technical rock garden features with larger obstacles.  More advanced / technical rock gardens teach riders how to shift their body weight appropriately through obstacles and how to also lift their rear wheel to clear obstacles.

Purchase Options

Product Name:Best For:Product Image:Price:
Sender Rock GardenBeginner to advanced kid riders! Rock heights are not adjustable, but position of rocks is adjustable. For beginners, we would recommend setting up the smallest rocks. Sender Rock Garden$326
Byclex Rock GardenBeginner riders and up! You can adjust the heights and positions of rock features. Byclex Rock Garden$53

DIY Rock Gardens – Tips and Hacks

Rock gardens require the least amount of wood working skills. You can simply find a patch of dirt and partially bury some rocks in your backyard! Or, use small pieces of wood and scatter them over the driveway to simulate a rock garden feature or attach the wood pieces to plywood.

For a more sophisticated portable rock garden, purchase rock climbing holds and screw them to plywood or some type of plank.

 


Complete Backyard Build by Tim Tucker


One of our favorite members of our Two Wheeling Tots community is Tim Tucker extraordinaire, who has given us a peak into his amazing backyard. He also shared some of his experience and wisdom gained through his backyard building. But first can we appreciate his beyond epic backyard? Who are his lucky neighbors???

 

Backyard Kids Bike Ramps – Building Tips and Hacks from Tim Tucker

  • When building for kids, keep features straight forward and focus on one thing at a time i.e. bumpy, steep, narrow, rolling, etc.
  • You will find that there is a fine balance between building something that will be challenging and building something that is too intimidating to ride. You’re almost guaranteed to get it wrong sometimes. 
  • 90% of materials used are treated 2×6’s and 3″ deck screws.
      • 2×6’s cost about the same as decking, but are more flexible in what you can use them for. They are also rated for ground contact and should last longer.
  • Mowing and weeding underneath features is a pain. We put wood chips under everything. You can also put cardboard down underneath the wood chips to further prevent weeds and grass from growing.

Frequently Asked Questions About Kids Bike Ramps

What materials and tools will I need to build a DIY ramp?

This is not a comprehensive list of every tool or piece of material needed in every ramp scenario. But in general this is what you can expect to need.

Tools:

  • Circular Saw or Table Saw
  • Circular Saw or Miter Saw
  • Jig Saw
  • Power Drill
  • Tape Measure
  • Safety Glasses
      • Helpful but not absolutely necessary:
          • Sander
          • Clamps
          • Level
          • Speed Square
          • Chalk Line
          • Carpenter Pencil
          • Saw blades to cut metal sheeting
          • PVC Pipe or Flexible Ruler – to trace curved ramps

Materials:

Where can I find building plans?

YouTube is littered with building ideas and plans. There seems to be more videos showing how to build ramps versus physical building plans. We have included a few building plans per ramp mentioned above.

Roller Ramps 

Tabletop Ramps

Kicker Ramps

Teeter Totters

How will I transport my ramp?

Transporting your ramp may be difficult, especially if you build a DIY roller or tabletop. They are going to be big and bulky. We have used different hacks like putting wheels and handles on our ramps for easier transporting.

DIY kicker ramps tend to be more transportable than rollers and tabletops. We listed two portable DIY kicker ramp options in our kicker ramp section – Seth Bike Hacks and Sam Pilgrim (so small it fits in a bag).

The best solution for easy transporting is purchasing a ramp that breaks down. Companies are building light weight ramps that easily condense down. We tested out the Byclex Yumpy and loved how their kicker ramp folds up into a backpack! Talk about easy. You may also want to check out MTB Hopper Intro Ramp or Freshpark Portable Wedge Kicker. 

While a ramp being big and bulky makes transporting hard, the weight of a ramp is often the biggest barrier in  transporting – even in just getting it in and out of the garage! Check out our question on heavy DIY ramps below to see some weight hacks we have used to lighten ramps.

Aren't DIY ramps really heavy?

DIY kids bike ramps can be extremely heavy. This is not a big deal if your ramp has a permanent location in your yard. But for those parents who are moving their ramps around, to the front yard, street, backyard, etc. a heavy ramp can be a pain. Here are a couple hacks we tried to make our DIY ramps lighter.

  • Use smaller pieces of wood for framing and supports. In our DIY roller ramp, we used 2×3’s instead of 2×4’s to save on weight. However, be careful that you are still building a well supported structure.
  • Using plywood for the deck of your ramp is going to be lighter weight than building a deck with 2×6’s or some other wood block dimension.
  • Slat the deck of your ramp to save on weight.  But note that slatted ramps are not great for balance bikers!

If weight is a concern, then we recommend looking at purchasable ramps. Here are some weight comparisons.

Product Name:Weight Best For:Product Image:Price
Byclex Yumpy14 pounds Beginner riders and up! Beginners can use this ramp, as you can drop down the ramp for a smaller drop. Kid bike tester using the Yumpy in the picture above. Yumpy$106
Byclex Portable Table Top18.7 pounds A more advanced kicker, but has 3 height settings to accommodateBeginner riders and up! Tabletop is about 16.4" wide, a little narrow for a balance biker. Byclex Ramp$161
Freshpark BMX Single Pump Track90 pounds Beginner riders and up! Width is great for a balance bike, but may be a little steep with a height of 18". Single Pump Track$445
Landwave Skateboard Ramp 2 Pack16 pounds Beginner riders and up! Beginners may want to use against a curb.Landwave 2pack Ramps$86
1080 Launch Ramp5.2 pounds Beginner riders and up! Beginners may want to use against a curb. Recommended for ages 8 and up. 1080 Launch$34
New MTB Hopper Intro11 pounds Best for intermediate to advanced kid riders. Height can be adjusted. Intro$182
Freshpark Portable Wedge Kicker23 pounds Beginner riders and up! Beginners may want to use against a curb. Freshpark Kicker$162
Graw Jump Ramps G20 13 - 22 poundsBeginner riders and up! The G20 is great for beginners. The G35 is better for intermediate to advanced riders. Graw Jump Ramps$127 - $166

What if I live in an apartment?

If you live in an apartment, storing, transporting, and weight are going to be important factors. With limited storing space, building a DIY ramp may be difficult.

You could try the DIY kicker by Sam Pilgrim (so small it fits in a bag). Or check out these purchasable ramps Byclex Ramps, MTB Hopper Intro Ramp or Freshpark Portable Wedge Kicker. 

Both of these ramps condense down so small you could easily store in a closet, under a bed, or on a balcony.

You could also look at our Kid-Friendly Bike Park Directory to see if there are bike parks or pump tracks in your area!

Where do I store my ramp?

Before building or buying a kids bike ramp, you will want to ask the question of how or where you will store your ramps. If your ramps have a permanent location in the backyard, then the answer is easy. But if you will be storing in the garage, house, or side yard then here are a few considerations.

  • Storing the ramp tilted on its side saves considerable floor space.
  • You may want to consider a purchasable ramp. We would recommend Byclex Ramps, MTB Hopper Intro Ramp or Freshpark Portable Wedge Kicker.  These ramps condense down so small, you could easily store in smaller, tighter spaces.
  • There are some smaller DIY builds that would accommodate those with limited storage space. You could try the DIY kicker by Sam Pilgrim (so small it fits in a bag).
  • There are DIY builds that are designed to store better. Check out Nj Jefferz’s DIY Wood Roller Build. His rollers are designed to stack and store efficiently.
  • You could try to mimic Timberfly’s Russian Roller Ramps that stack and store inside of each other. We wish Timberfly Ramps shipped to the U.S., otherwise they would be included in our purchase options!

Can I use leftover wood?

Absolutely! Use what you have around the house. You may be limited in creating certain dimensions or using the lightest weight materials, and you may still have to make a pit stop at Home Depot.

If nothing else, use your leftover wood to create skinnies and other obstacle courses for your kids. You can even just take a piece of 2×4 and saw it into 4-5 inch pieces and scatter them along the driveway to simulate obstacle riding or “rock gardens”.

What is the best way to protect my ramp from weather or the elements?

Use treated lumber. Tim Tucker mentions above that he prefers to use treated 2×6’s to make his ramps last longer.

If you have the time and willpower, painting your ramp with exterior grade paint will make your ramp last longer. Ideally, you would paint the entire ramp as the paint will help with weather protection and other elements like humidity, sun, hot dry air, etc. If you don’t paint your ramp try and store in the garage, shed, house or under a tarp.

Some choose to surface their ramp with Masonite. It is recommended to waterproof your Masonite as it will also absorb moisture and rot.

In addition to waterproofing or painting your ramp, use exterior grade screws (like deck screws) to help the longevity of your ramp.

Don’t want the hassle of a wood ramp? One of the best weather proof kids bike ramps you can purchase is the Freshpark Portable Wedge Kicker.  Freshpark ramps are made with powder-coated steel that will last 10 times longer than wood ramps. The price isn’t half bad either.

Any other resources?

Here are other resources to look at if you want more information and more advanced building.

Big thanks to Tim Tucker for sharing all these awesome resources for our readers!

 

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